KATE KAMINSKI
Kate Kaminski majored in Psychology as an undergraduate at University of Texas at Austin and received her masters in Film Production from Boston University. She is a writer-director whose films have screened in festivals all over the world.

With partner Betsy Carson, she is half the creative team Gitgo Productions. The pair have produced over 20 films - short and feature-length, fiction and non-fiction. Kaminski also teaches screenwriting, production, and film studies part-time at Maine College of Art in Portland, ME.

In 2011, she founded the Bluestocking Film Series, an event focused on finding and screening great films that pass the Bechdel Test and feature female protagonists in leading roles.

Content copyright 2009-2014. Kate Kaminski. All rights reserved.
KATE KAMINSKI
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I’m a diehard nonconformist, but I do adhere to three rules when I’m making a film. The first comes out of my inborn impulse to swim against the tide and make waves while I’m at it.
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My approach to filmmaking is part anarchist, part formalist. I love to break the rules.
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   My last rule of filmmaking is to never give people what they expect. To me it’s just incredibly boring to watch a film and be 10 steps ahead of the characters and story. Why bother to see a film you’ve already seen a thousand times before? I have more respect for my audiences than that.
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Rocking the Boat: A Call for Solidarity on Medium. https://medium.com/p/3ce5399de233
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The Crew, a comedy about filmmaking.
GitgoFilms on Twitter
WritingFilm on Pinterest
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Bluestocking Film Series screens high-quality, cutting edge films that pass the Bechdel Test and feature complex female protagonists. Click for more information and to submit your film.
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Women characters deserve to be portrayed as we really are – that we are as flawed, as heroic, and as capable as our male counterparts goes without saying.
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Behold the traits of a complex female protagonist. You might notice these are pretty much the same qualities inherent in most complex male protagonists.
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Weight was my first film shot on video. Even with the clunkiness of this early technology - linear editing! - I knew I was hooked because I could now make films without the expense of processing and printing.
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"There’s a misogyny in audiences, a much higher bar of required likability for women stars. You need to make the actress completely adorable, or else she’ll be thought of as the straight man or the bummer.” So states director Nicholas Stoller discussing how to write for women in comedy films."
http://archives.newyorker.com/?i=2011-04-11#folio=052
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"Whenever I make the choice to go with a female protagonist, I’m taking a risk. There’s a persistent notion that men won’t go to films with a female lead character because they’re unable to identify with her but this notion sadly underestimates men and certainly undervalues women’s stories."

From my talk at Pecha Kucha Portland, fall 2013. http://youtu.be/SXyHibvn7cg

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The film goer interested in relatable characters is just not going to be my kind of a audience. To be unable to relate to or to actively dislike a character because she’s flawed or she acts inappropriately, seems strange to me. Those characters are the ones I love most and those characters are the ones I want to portray and see onscreen.
For that matter, the men characters I relate to most are the anti-heroes. Well, where are the women anti-heroes? Where can we see strong, complex woman characters who, in the course of the narrative, go through their trial by fire to come out the other side with us cheering them on?
You might be thinking – and I hear a lot of: “But what about Girls?” or “What about The Hunger Games?” These are surely examples of strong female protagonists, aren’t they? As if these two examples – or the handful of other examples – meet a sort of quota system and somehow erase the need to continue asking the question: where are the female protagonists?
The film goer interested in relatable characters is just not going to be my kind of a audience. To be unable to relate to or to actively dislike a character because she’s flawed or she acts inappropriately, seems strange to me. Those characters are the ones I love most and those characters are the ones I want to portray and see onscreen.
For that matter, the men characters I relate to most are the anti-heroes. Well, where are the women anti-heroes? Where can we see strong, complex woman characters who, in the course of the narrative, go through their trial by fire to come out the other side with us cheering them on?
You might be thinking – and I hear a lot of: “But what about Girls?” or “What about The Hunger Games?” These are surely examples of strong female protagonists, aren’t they? As if these two examples – or the handful of other examples – meet a sort of quota system and somehow erase the need to continue asking the question: where are the female protagonists?
The film goer interested in relatable characters is just not going to be my kind of a audience. To be unable to relate to or to actively dislike a character because she’s flawed or she acts inappropriately, seems strange to me. Those characters are the ones I love most and those characters are the ones I want to portray and see onscreen.
For that matter, the men characters I relate to most are the anti-heroes. Well, where are the women anti-heroes? Where can we see strong, complex woman characters who, in the course of the narrative, go through their trial by fire to come out the other side with us cheering them on?
You might be thinking – and I hear a lot of: “But what about Girls?” or “What about The Hunger Games?” These are surely examples of strong female protagonists, aren’t they? As if these two examples – or the handful of other examples – meet a sort of quota system and somehow erase the need to continue asking the question: where are the female protagonists?
The film goer interested in relatable characters is just not going to be my kind of a audience. To be unable to relate to or to actively dislike a character because she’s flawed or she acts inappropriately, seems strange to me. Those characters are the ones I love most and those characters are the ones I want to portray and see onscreen.
For that matter, the men characters I relate to most are the anti-heroes. Well, where are the women anti-heroes? Where can we see strong, complex woman characters who, in the course of the narrative, go through their trial by fire to come out the other side with us cheering them on?
You might be thinking – and I hear a lot of: “But what about Girls?” or “What about The Hunger Games?” These are surely examples of strong female protagonists, aren’t they? As if these two examples – or the handful of other examples – meet a sort of quota system and somehow erase the need to continue asking the question: where are the female protagonists?
The film goer interested in relatable characters is just not going to be my kind of a audience. To be unable to relate to or to actively dislike a character because she’s flawed or she acts inappropriately, seems strange to me. Those characters are the ones I love most and those characters are the ones I want to portray and see onscreen.
For that matter, the men characters I relate to most are the anti-heroes. Well, where are the women anti-heroes? Where can we see strong, complex woman characters who, in the course of the narrative, go through their trial by fire to come out the other side with us cheering them on?
You might be thinking – and I hear a lot of: “But what about Girls?” or “What about The Hunger Games?” These are surely examples of strong female protagonists, aren’t they? As if these two examples – or the handful of other examples – meet a sort of quota system and somehow erase the need to continue asking the question: where are the female protagonists?
The film goer interested in relatable characters is just not going to be my kind of a audience. To be unable to relate to or to actively dislike a character because she’s flawed or she acts inappropriately, seems strange to me. Those characters are the ones I love most and those characters are the ones I want to portray and see onscreen.
For that matter, the men characters I relate to most are the anti-heroes. Well, where are the women anti-heroes? Where can we see strong, complex woman characters who, in the course of the narrative, go through their trial by fire to come out the other side with us cheering them on?
You might be thinking – and I hear a lot of: “But what about Girls?” or “What about The Hunger Games?” These are surely examples of strong female protagonists, aren’t they? As if these two examples – or the handful of other examples – meet a sort of quota system and somehow erase the need to continue asking the question: where are the female protagonists?
The film goer interested in relatable characters is just not going to be my kind of a audience. To be unable to relate to or to actively dislike a character because she’s flawed or she acts inappropriately, seems strange to me. Those characters are the ones I love most and those characters are the ones I want to portray and see onscreen.
For that matter, the men characters I relate to most are the anti-heroes. Well, where are the women anti-heroes? Where can we see strong, complex woman characters who, in the course of the narrative, go through their trial by fire to come out the other side with us cheering them on?
You might be thinking – and I hear a lot of: “But what about Girls?” or “What about The Hunger Games?” These are surely examples of strong female protagonists, aren’t they? As if these two examples – or the handful of other examples – meet a sort of quota system and somehow erase the need to continue asking the question: where are the female protagonists?
The film goer interested in relatable characters is just not going to be my kind of a audience. To be unable to relate to or to actively dislike a character because she’s flawed or she acts inappropriately, seems strange to me. Those characters are the ones I love most and those characters are the ones I want to portray and see onscreen.
For that matter, the men characters I relate to most are the anti-heroes. Well, where are the women anti-heroes? Where can we see strong, complex woman characters who, in the course of the narrative, go through their trial by fire to come out the other side with us cheering them on?
You might be thinking – and I hear a lot of: “But what about Girls?” or “What about The Hunger Games?” These are surely examples of strong female protagonists, aren’t they? As if these two examples – or the handful of other examples – meet a sort of quota system and somehow erase the need to continue asking the question: where are the female protagonists?
The film goer interested in relatable characters is just not going to be my kind of a audience. To be unable to relate to or to actively dislike a character because she’s flawed or she acts inappropriately, seems strange to me. Those characters are the ones I love most and those characters are the ones I want to portray and see onscreen.
For that matter, the men characters I relate to most are the anti-heroes. Well, where are the women anti-heroes? Where can we see strong, complex woman characters who, in the course of the narrative, go through their trial by fire to come out the other side with us cheering them on?
You might be thinking – and I hear a lot of: “But what about Girls?” or “What about The Hunger Games?” These are surely examples of strong female protagonists, aren’t they? As if these two examples – or the handful of other examples – meet a sort of quota system and somehow erase the need to continue asking the question: where are the female protagonists?